Wines reflect the character of their soil Export Typical Italian Products, Prodotti Tipici Italiani

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Wines reflect the character of their soil

Categories: Food and Wines Articles - Sunday, 26 April 2015

 

Many wines reflect the local characteristics of where they are grown because wine has a strong connection to the dirt (the earth). On a recent trip to Greece, I learned the wine there is actually grown on an old volcano, and instead of growing on a vine, it grows on more of a bush. The grapes get their nourishment from below the earth’s surface since there is hardly any measurable rainfall.

Reader Ken Fuller, from Altadena, posed a great question. Do you have any suggestions for what “brand” to order at a restaurant or to buy at your local market, if you aren’t exactly sure? I have the tip to last you a lifetime. Simply choose the region of wines that you enjoy. It’s no secret that many wineries share or sell grapes to their neighbors, and there’s nothing wrong with that, especially for blends. We can’t all afford Stag Leaps or Caymus 46 every day (at least I can’t!).

For many years, the Alexander Valley part of the Sonoma County has been producing some of the best cabernets in California, and some of my favorite wines come from this region. I recently discovered a 2012 Picket Fence that meets all of the above criteria. Although the 2012 harvest wasn’t supposed to exceed the 2011 harvest, it just may have, helped by perfect rain totals. This wine has a ruby-black color, with aromas of peppered bacon (yes, men, rejoice!), and a spice-driven finish with firm woody (light) tannins. This cabernet is a B+ bargain at $12. Is it the regions best? No, but if you let the bottle breathe for a while and then serve it in a large-mouthed wine glass, you can’t go wrong with this 2012 cabernet. Perfect pairing for this would be a nice porterhouse steak. Yum. Just to recap, you can’t go wrong with Alexander Valley grown grapes, especially 2012!

DILLS’ SCORE

Each week I will give you my Dill’s Score. Starting with a base of 50 points, I have added 8 points for color, 8 points for aroma or “nose,” 8 points for taste, 8 points for finish, and 8 points for my overall impression, which includes my value rating.

Total Score 90.

Listen to Dining with Dills this Sunday, at 6 p.m., on KLAA AM 830 and watch the TV version Saturday and Sundays at 7:00 p.m. on Charter Channel 188.

Save the Date: Taste of San Marino/An Evening at the Huntington, May 14th 5:00 p.m. For tickets call the San Marino Chamber at (626) 289-1022.

Source: sgvtribune.com

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